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BEST PUSH – UP ROUTINES

ROUTINES?

Aren’t push – ups those things that we do 10 – 20 of before we start our day? Or move on to the rest of our workout? Or go take a shower?

The SEAL push – up challenge sounds easy. At first. There are 5 steps:

  1. Perform one push – up, followed by one kneeling vertical press with no weight
  2. Then 2 push ups and 2 vertical presses
  3. Then 3 and 3 (piece of cake so far!)
  4. Then continue adding one push – up and one kneeling vertical press for as many rounds as you can. By the tenth round, you will have done 55 push – ups and 55 kneeling vertical presses (getting tougher!)
  5. This should be continued until your arms give out and you can do no more.

The reason why no weight is used for the vertical press is that the weight would create fatigue and thus make the program easier since arms would give out sooner. The very brief rest between the push – up and the vertical press makes the participant wonder if he / she can produce another set under stress. This produces mental toughness.

Here is another routine, this one by a former Seal:

  • On odd days – do 200 push – ups in as few sets as possible. 4 sets of 50, 8 sets of 25, etc.
  • On even days – do 200 push – ups during the day, either in sets of 10 every half hour or 4 sets of 50 at various times
  • The odd / even routine should be done for 10 days straight. Then rest. Do not do this program more than once every 6 months.

Still another routine – one ambitious young man embarked on a program of 100 push – ups per day for 30 days. His beginning measurements were as follows: chest – 43.5″, waist – 38 “, right biceps – 15.5 “, left biceps – 15 “., weight – 203.6

His final measurements were these: chest – 45.5 “, waist – 35 “, right biceps – 16 3/4”, left biceps – 16.5 “, weight – 196.5

POWER PRESS PUSH – UP DEVICE

My house is a bit cluttered with work – out equipment. I have mentioned a treadmill, 4 sets of dumbbells, 2 Bullworkers, several resistance cord sets, several abdominal devices and an inversion table. I also have a Power Press. This is a very innovative, color – coded push – up board. Another purchase from Amazon. This is a complete push – up system, with 28 hand positions or 14 possible ways to place your two hands. The postions are recessed so that 2 handles may be placed and moved about to achieve different results.

A push – up done with handles several inches deep is more challenging and more beneficial than a push – up performed with hands flat on the floor. This is moving the push – up toward a parallel bar dip in effectiveness. You are dipping deeper and the range of motion is greater.

The hand positions are set high to low and with different angles. This allows me to work the body part that I wish to target: chest, triceps, back or shoulders. The colors are coded accordingly. This presents a tough workout, challenging enough that I don’t use the Power Press often or for prolonged periods. When I do use the Power Press, it is for 2 sets of 10-12 reps for each of the four muscle groups shown above. There is not a specific biceps exercise with the Power Press, so I add 2 sets of dumbbell curls per each arm.

DON’T EVER UNDERESTIMATE PUSH – UPS

They have been around for many decades, thus they have stood the test of time.  You can do them simply or with embellishments. 10- 20 at a time or with the added toughness of a Navy Seal’s program. There is not much better for a combination pectoral / triceps muscle builder. One point to emphasize – do them slowly with arms fully extended, chest touching near the floor as you lower your body and pausing briefly before pushing up. Forget about doing them fast, one after another to impress someone. Get the full benefit of this great exercise.

LET ME KNOW IF THIS IS HELPFUL

Today’s post may be more appropriate for men than women, though not necessarily. Some tough routines were shown. But the rawest beginner of any sex or strength level can at least start with push – ups with knees touching the floor. Progress is quickly made, given continued training, regardless of the starting point. Leave me any questions or comments that you may have. See the “comments” box below. Or email me – richard@myworkoutathome.com. Be well!

Richard

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